Dr. Kris Discusses Role of Antiangiogenesis in Lung Cancer

Mark G. Kris, MD
Published: Thursday, Jan 24, 2019



Mark G. Kris, MD, medical oncologist, William and Joy Ruane Chair in Thoracic Oncology, Memorial Sloanlop Kettering Cancer Center, discusses the role of antiangiogenesis in the treatment of patients with lung cancer.

For decades, researchers have understood that in order for cancers to survive, they need to create their own blood supply system. That system is different than the one in a patient’s normal tissue and has some vulnerabilities that therapies can exploit. VEGF targeted agents are a standard of care across multiple histologies. For lung cancer in particular, bevacizumab (Avastin) and ramucirumab (Cyramza) are FDA-approved in a variety of settings.

However, with the recent rise of other therapies, such as checkpoint inhibitors and novel combinations, these antiangiogenic agents have essentially been moved to the back burner. Kris notes that despite this, there are still specific instances where bevacizumab and ramucirumab can have significant impact, and as such, it’s important to remember these agents and use them when appropriate. In the future, these drugs will likely be used to bolster the impact of chemotherapy and immunotherapy in patients with lung cancer.
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Mark G. Kris, MD, medical oncologist, William and Joy Ruane Chair in Thoracic Oncology, Memorial Sloanlop Kettering Cancer Center, discusses the role of antiangiogenesis in the treatment of patients with lung cancer.

For decades, researchers have understood that in order for cancers to survive, they need to create their own blood supply system. That system is different than the one in a patient’s normal tissue and has some vulnerabilities that therapies can exploit. VEGF targeted agents are a standard of care across multiple histologies. For lung cancer in particular, bevacizumab (Avastin) and ramucirumab (Cyramza) are FDA-approved in a variety of settings.

However, with the recent rise of other therapies, such as checkpoint inhibitors and novel combinations, these antiangiogenic agents have essentially been moved to the back burner. Kris notes that despite this, there are still specific instances where bevacizumab and ramucirumab can have significant impact, and as such, it’s important to remember these agents and use them when appropriate. In the future, these drugs will likely be used to bolster the impact of chemotherapy and immunotherapy in patients with lung cancer.



View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Advances in™ Therapies for Patients With ALK-Positive Lung Cancers: More Options…More Decisions…Better OutcomesAug 30, 20191.5
Oncology Briefings™: Treating Advanced NSCLC Without Actionable MutationsAug 30, 20191.0
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