Dr. Lennes Discusses Ongoing Research on Screening Techniques for Lung Cancer

Inga T. Lennes, MD, MBA, MPH
Published: Friday, Sep 13, 2019



Inga T. Lennes, MD, MBA, MPH, senior vice president of Performance Improvement and Service Excellence of the Mass General Physicians Organization, medical director, Ambulatory Services, and director of clinical quality, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, discusses ongoing research on screening techniques for lung cancer.

Some of the most exciting work that's being done in lung screening has to do with the new techniques for volume metric analysis, different artificial intelligence, and deep learning algorithms, says Lennes. The ability of the human eyes to detect small lung nodules is limited. Although radiologists are great in that regard, it’ll be interesting to see how computers can supplement humans by sorting through large volumes of imaging data to detect cancers, she adds.

Lennes has a friend who works at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who is focused on deep learning and models in radiology and screening. She has been told that the future of finding cancers is going to lie in the data. Currently, the magnitude of data that is received from images has only been processed by the human eye. Once artificial intelligence is applied to those data, computers could potentially pinpoint cases of cancer from already existent data, concludes Lennes.
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Inga T. Lennes, MD, MBA, MPH, senior vice president of Performance Improvement and Service Excellence of the Mass General Physicians Organization, medical director, Ambulatory Services, and director of clinical quality, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, discusses ongoing research on screening techniques for lung cancer.

Some of the most exciting work that's being done in lung screening has to do with the new techniques for volume metric analysis, different artificial intelligence, and deep learning algorithms, says Lennes. The ability of the human eyes to detect small lung nodules is limited. Although radiologists are great in that regard, it’ll be interesting to see how computers can supplement humans by sorting through large volumes of imaging data to detect cancers, she adds.

Lennes has a friend who works at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who is focused on deep learning and models in radiology and screening. She has been told that the future of finding cancers is going to lie in the data. Currently, the magnitude of data that is received from images has only been processed by the human eye. Once artificial intelligence is applied to those data, computers could potentially pinpoint cases of cancer from already existent data, concludes Lennes.

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