Dr. Litzow on New Immunologic Therapies in ALL

Mark R. Litzow, MD
Published: Thursday, May 15, 2014

Mark R. Litzow, MD, a professor of Medicine in the Division of Hematology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, discusses novel immunologic therapies for the treatment of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

These novel therapies possess the ability to treat patients with relapsed/refractory ALL, even those with MRD-positive disease. One of the therapies, the bispecific T-cell-engaging (BiTE) antibody blinatumomab, has demonstrated efficacy in clinical trials. This therapy combines two single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies that are specific to CD3 T cells and CD19 lymphoblasts.

Another promising immunotherapeutic approach in ALL utilizes genetically modified T cells that express chimeric antigen receptors. These therapies are engineered using scFv antitumor antibodies, such as those against CD19. Early evidence suggests these therapies are very effective against ALL, Litzow notes.

Based on promising early evidence, the CAR-modified T cells are being moved toward front-line therapy in order to improve the overall outcomes of both younger and older adults with ALL, Litzow says. ​

Mark R. Litzow, MD, a professor of Medicine in the Division of Hematology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, discusses novel immunologic therapies for the treatment of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

These novel therapies possess the ability to treat patients with relapsed/refractory ALL, even those with MRD-positive disease. One of the therapies, the bispecific T-cell-engaging (BiTE) antibody blinatumomab, has demonstrated efficacy in clinical trials. This therapy combines two single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies that are specific to CD3 T cells and CD19 lymphoblasts.

Another promising immunotherapeutic approach in ALL utilizes genetically modified T cells that express chimeric antigen receptors. These therapies are engineered using scFv antitumor antibodies, such as those against CD19. Early evidence suggests these therapies are very effective against ALL, Litzow notes.

Based on promising early evidence, the CAR-modified T cells are being moved toward front-line therapy in order to improve the overall outcomes of both younger and older adults with ALL, Litzow says. ​




View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x