Dr. Mok on Dacomitinib for First-Line Lung Cancer Treatment

Tony S.K Mok, BMSc, MD, FRCPC
Published: Thursday, Jul 05, 2018



Tony S.K Mok, MD, professor, Department of Clinical Oncology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, China, discusses dacomitinib as a first-line treatment for EGFR-positive non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). He presented updated ARCHER 1050 trial data at the 2018 ASCO Annual Meeting.

Dacomitinib is a second-generation EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) and uses covalent bonding to track the EGFR mutations, which Mok says makes it a more potent inhibitor than the standard first-generation TKI gefitinib (Iressa). ARCHER 1050 showed that dacomitinib significantly improved the primary endpoints of progression-free survival, duration of response, and time to treatment failure, compared with gefitinib.

In the phase III study, patients were randomized to orally receive either 45 mg/day of dacomitinib or 250 mg/day of gefitinib. Dacomitinib showed a notable improvement in median overall survival of 34.1 months compared with 26.8 months with gefitinib.

Mok adds that toxicity levels were significantly higher for patients who received dacomitinib, which is something researchers are investigating.
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Tony S.K Mok, MD, professor, Department of Clinical Oncology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, China, discusses dacomitinib as a first-line treatment for EGFR-positive non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). He presented updated ARCHER 1050 trial data at the 2018 ASCO Annual Meeting.

Dacomitinib is a second-generation EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) and uses covalent bonding to track the EGFR mutations, which Mok says makes it a more potent inhibitor than the standard first-generation TKI gefitinib (Iressa). ARCHER 1050 showed that dacomitinib significantly improved the primary endpoints of progression-free survival, duration of response, and time to treatment failure, compared with gefitinib.

In the phase III study, patients were randomized to orally receive either 45 mg/day of dacomitinib or 250 mg/day of gefitinib. Dacomitinib showed a notable improvement in median overall survival of 34.1 months compared with 26.8 months with gefitinib.

Mok adds that toxicity levels were significantly higher for patients who received dacomitinib, which is something researchers are investigating.

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