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Dr. Neelapu on Next Steps With KTE-C19 in Lymphoma

Sattva S. Neelapu, MD
Published: Wednesday, Feb 01, 2017



Sattva S. Neelapu, MD, associate professor, Department of Lymphoma/Myeloma, Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses the next steps with KTE-C19, an anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy explored in the ZUMA-1 trial for patients with aggressive lymphomas.

There is still much more work to be done with this treatment, Neelapu explains. For example, researchers want to further improve the complete remission rates with KTE-C19 in these patients. Additionally, combination trials with checkpoint inhibitors such as anti–PD-L1 agents have recently been initiated.

Researchers are also doing extensive biomarker analyses to further understand what the main drivers are for cytokine release syndrome and the neurological events—both of which are associated with KTE-C19—so that they can be better managed, he says. This will also help to develop an understanding of why some patients don’t respond and others progress after initial response. In conclusion, this would help guide researchers in future combination trials to further improve the outcomes of these patients, he adds.


Sattva S. Neelapu, MD, associate professor, Department of Lymphoma/Myeloma, Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses the next steps with KTE-C19, an anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy explored in the ZUMA-1 trial for patients with aggressive lymphomas.

There is still much more work to be done with this treatment, Neelapu explains. For example, researchers want to further improve the complete remission rates with KTE-C19 in these patients. Additionally, combination trials with checkpoint inhibitors such as anti–PD-L1 agents have recently been initiated.

Researchers are also doing extensive biomarker analyses to further understand what the main drivers are for cytokine release syndrome and the neurological events—both of which are associated with KTE-C19—so that they can be better managed, he says. This will also help to develop an understanding of why some patients don’t respond and others progress after initial response. In conclusion, this would help guide researchers in future combination trials to further improve the outcomes of these patients, he adds.



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