Dr. Oh Discusses Updates in Bladder Cancer Treatment

William K. Oh, MD
Published: Monday, Nov 24, 2014

William K. Oh, MD, Chief of the Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, the Tisch Cancer Institute at Mount Sinai Medical Center, discusses recent updates in bladder cancer treatment.

Oh says bladder cancer has been a difficult disease to treat for many years. Since the approval of gemcitabine 10-15 years ago, there really has not been anything approved for this disease.

At the 2014 Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium, Matthew Milowsky, MD, from UNC Lineberg, discussed new targets for the treatment of bladder cancer, Oh says. These targets are both molecular, such as FGFR, and immune targets, such as PD-1 and PD-L1.

Oh says bladder cancer is very much driven by mutational changes that make it a good 'immunogenic cancer.' PD-1 and PD-L1 antibodies have now shown in clinical trials to have very significant activity in up to 1/3 of patients or more, Oh says.

William K. Oh, MD, Chief of the Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, the Tisch Cancer Institute at Mount Sinai Medical Center, discusses recent updates in bladder cancer treatment.

Oh says bladder cancer has been a difficult disease to treat for many years. Since the approval of gemcitabine 10-15 years ago, there really has not been anything approved for this disease.

At the 2014 Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium, Matthew Milowsky, MD, from UNC Lineberg, discussed new targets for the treatment of bladder cancer, Oh says. These targets are both molecular, such as FGFR, and immune targets, such as PD-1 and PD-L1.

Oh says bladder cancer is very much driven by mutational changes that make it a good 'immunogenic cancer.' PD-1 and PD-L1 antibodies have now shown in clinical trials to have very significant activity in up to 1/3 of patients or more, Oh says.


View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Community Practice Connections™: 18th Annual International Lung Cancer Congress®Oct 31, 20181.5
Provider and Caregiver Connection™: Addressing Patient Concerns While Managing Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and VomitingOct 31, 20182.0
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x