Dr. Paik on the Potential Approval of Lorlatinib for Patients With ALK-Positive NSCLC

Paul K. Paik, MD
Published: Wednesday, May 09, 2018



Paul K. Paik, MD, clinical director of the Thoracic Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, discusses how the potential approval of lorlatinib may alter the landscape for patients with ALK-positive non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Although the data with lorlatinib remain unclear, the potential approval of this agent will give physicians a new tool to use, says Paik. As long as there is a rational approach to this—based on how the patient is doing and what the molecular biology is with additional testing—it is certainly a reasonable approach in the post-alectinib (Alecensa) setting, he adds.

Other options should and can be considered, says Paik. One option is ALK inhibitors, particularly if the mutation-specific data warn against lorlatinib use. Another treatment option to consider is chemotherapy. Chemotherapy is still a very good option for these patients and should definitely be considered for treatment, particularly if a physician needs something reliable to get a patient over their symptoms, says Paik.
 


Paul K. Paik, MD, clinical director of the Thoracic Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, discusses how the potential approval of lorlatinib may alter the landscape for patients with ALK-positive non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Although the data with lorlatinib remain unclear, the potential approval of this agent will give physicians a new tool to use, says Paik. As long as there is a rational approach to this—based on how the patient is doing and what the molecular biology is with additional testing—it is certainly a reasonable approach in the post-alectinib (Alecensa) setting, he adds.

Other options should and can be considered, says Paik. One option is ALK inhibitors, particularly if the mutation-specific data warn against lorlatinib use. Another treatment option to consider is chemotherapy. Chemotherapy is still a very good option for these patients and should definitely be considered for treatment, particularly if a physician needs something reliable to get a patient over their symptoms, says Paik.
 



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