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Dr. Parsa on the Administration of the G-200 Vaccine in GBM

Andrew T. Parsa, MD, PhD
Published: Wednesday, Aug 21, 2013

Andrew T. Parsa, MD, PhD, Associate Professor in Residence of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, describes the administration of the prophage G-200 for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.

A patient does not have to go through leukapheresis, nor receive additional cytokines such as GM-CSF, a common approach for many types of vaccines for brain tumor patients. As a part of standard of care, a patient undergoes surgical resection. That resected tissue is used to make the vaccine. In a majority of cases, patients who have a recurrent glioblastoma can have the vaccine made from surgical resection without an issue.

A physician will administer as many doses as a patient can tolerate with regard to the amount of vaccine, up to six, Parsa says.

Andrew T. Parsa, MD, PhD, Associate Professor in Residence of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, describes the administration of the prophage G-200 for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.

A patient does not have to go through leukapheresis, nor receive additional cytokines such as GM-CSF, a common approach for many types of vaccines for brain tumor patients. As a part of standard of care, a patient undergoes surgical resection. That resected tissue is used to make the vaccine. In a majority of cases, patients who have a recurrent glioblastoma can have the vaccine made from surgical resection without an issue.

A physician will administer as many doses as a patient can tolerate with regard to the amount of vaccine, up to six, Parsa says.


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