Dr. Richardson on the Use of CDK4/6 Inhibitors in HR+/HER2- Breast Cancer

Kristin J. Richardson, MD
Published: Friday, Apr 05, 2019



Kristin J. Richardson, MD, hematology/oncology fellow at Rush University Medical Center, discusses the use of CDK4/6 inhibitors in the treatment of patients with hormone receptor (HR)-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer.

CDK4/6 inhibitors have had a dramatic impact on the management of patients with metastatic HR-positive, HER2- breast cancer. Currently, all 3 agents—ribociclib (Kisqali), palbociclib (Ibrance), and abemaciclib (Verzenio)—are FDA approved and have since become the standard of care in the first- and second-line settings, says Richardson.

These agents, when used in combination with endocrine therapy, confer a consistent benefit in progression-free survival, allowing for a personalized treatment approach based on the patient and the prior therapies they have received. Determining which combination to administer depends on the comfort and experience of the provider, says Richardson. At Rush University Medical Center, physicians have more experience with palbociclib, since it was the first agent to receive regulatory approval. As such, physicians are more comfortable managing the adverse events associated with the treatment.
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Kristin J. Richardson, MD, hematology/oncology fellow at Rush University Medical Center, discusses the use of CDK4/6 inhibitors in the treatment of patients with hormone receptor (HR)-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer.

CDK4/6 inhibitors have had a dramatic impact on the management of patients with metastatic HR-positive, HER2- breast cancer. Currently, all 3 agents—ribociclib (Kisqali), palbociclib (Ibrance), and abemaciclib (Verzenio)—are FDA approved and have since become the standard of care in the first- and second-line settings, says Richardson.

These agents, when used in combination with endocrine therapy, confer a consistent benefit in progression-free survival, allowing for a personalized treatment approach based on the patient and the prior therapies they have received. Determining which combination to administer depends on the comfort and experience of the provider, says Richardson. At Rush University Medical Center, physicians have more experience with palbociclib, since it was the first agent to receive regulatory approval. As such, physicians are more comfortable managing the adverse events associated with the treatment.

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Community Practice Connections™: How Do We Leverage PARP Inhibition Strategies in the Contemporary Treatment of Breast Cancer?May 31, 20191.5
Community Practice Connections™: A Better Way to Stop Pain: Paths Toward Responsible Postsurgical Pain Management for Patients With Breast CancerMay 31, 20191.5
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