Dr. Rohs on the Use Liquid Biopsies in Lung Cancer

Nicholas C. Rohs, MD
Published: Monday, Jan 13, 2020



Nicholas C. Rohs, MD, assistant professor of medicine, hematology, and medical oncology, Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai, discusses the use of liquid biopsies in lung cancer.

Liquid biopsy is perhaps one of the most exciting diagnostic modalities in oncology, particularly in lung cancer, says Rohs. These biopsies provide more insight into a patient’s tumor by way of a blood test. Importantly, liquid biopsies could be prognostic as well as predictive, adds Rohs.

For example, MET amplification could be detected with a liquid biopsy; this information could provide insight into the outcome of the patient as well as direct appropriate treatment. Moreover, liquid biopsies are relatively noninvasive and have a faster turn-around time compared with procedures such as endobronchial ultrasounds and interventional radiology biopsies, concludes Rohs.
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Nicholas C. Rohs, MD, assistant professor of medicine, hematology, and medical oncology, Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai, discusses the use of liquid biopsies in lung cancer.

Liquid biopsy is perhaps one of the most exciting diagnostic modalities in oncology, particularly in lung cancer, says Rohs. These biopsies provide more insight into a patient’s tumor by way of a blood test. Importantly, liquid biopsies could be prognostic as well as predictive, adds Rohs.

For example, MET amplification could be detected with a liquid biopsy; this information could provide insight into the outcome of the patient as well as direct appropriate treatment. Moreover, liquid biopsies are relatively noninvasive and have a faster turn-around time compared with procedures such as endobronchial ultrasounds and interventional radiology biopsies, concludes Rohs.



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