Dr. Rosenberg Accepts His "Giants of Cancer Care" Award

Steven A. Rosenberg, MD, PhD
Published: Tuesday, Nov 05, 2013

Steven A. Rosenberg, MD, PhD, chief of surgery, National Cancer Institute, professor of surgery, Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences, George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, accepts the “Giants of Cancer Care” Award for his work in immunotherapy.

Rosenberg says receiving the award from OncLive is a humbling experience, especially since peers select the recipients of the awards. Rosenberg thanks both his peers and OncLive for the award.

Rosenberg has been the chief of surgery at the National Cancer Institute for 40 years. During this time, Rosenberg says, he has concentrated on developing new immunotherapies for the treatment of patients with cancer. Rosenberg says this is a field that is now moving very rapidly.

Rosenberg is credited with developing the use of IL-2 and immune cells for the treatment of patients with melanoma in a procedure termed adoptive cell transfer and has shown that expanding immune cells (known as tumor infiltrating lymphocytes) in the lab can be used to treat patients with melanoma.

Steven A. Rosenberg, MD, PhD, chief of surgery, National Cancer Institute, professor of surgery, Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences, George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, accepts the “Giants of Cancer Care” Award for his work in immunotherapy.

Rosenberg says receiving the award from OncLive is a humbling experience, especially since peers select the recipients of the awards. Rosenberg thanks both his peers and OncLive for the award.

Rosenberg has been the chief of surgery at the National Cancer Institute for 40 years. During this time, Rosenberg says, he has concentrated on developing new immunotherapies for the treatment of patients with cancer. Rosenberg says this is a field that is now moving very rapidly.

Rosenberg is credited with developing the use of IL-2 and immune cells for the treatment of patients with melanoma in a procedure termed adoptive cell transfer and has shown that expanding immune cells (known as tumor infiltrating lymphocytes) in the lab can be used to treat patients with melanoma.


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