Dr. Rugo on Proliferation as an Anti-Angiogenesis Marker

Hope S. Rugo, MD
Published: Wednesday, Oct 05, 2011

Hope S. Rugo, MD, clinical professor, Department of Medicine (Hematology/Oncology); and Director, Breast Oncology Clinical Trials Program, University of California, San Francisco, discusses the idea of using proliferation as a marker to predict response to angiogenesis inhibitors.

Rugo uses the investigation of PARP inhibitors such as iniparib in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) as an example of how hard it is to find a single marker that predict response in breast cancer.

The trials investigating PARP discovered that TNBC is a very heterogeneous disease that contains multiple intrinsic subtypes. Using only immunohistochemistry criteria to predict response to anti-angiogenesis will not work because of tumor heterogeneity.

Hope S. Rugo, MD, clinical professor, Department of Medicine (Hematology/Oncology); and Director, Breast Oncology Clinical Trials Program, University of California, San Francisco, discusses the idea of using proliferation as a marker to predict response to angiogenesis inhibitors.

Rugo uses the investigation of PARP inhibitors such as iniparib in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) as an example of how hard it is to find a single marker that predict response in breast cancer.

The trials investigating PARP discovered that TNBC is a very heterogeneous disease that contains multiple intrinsic subtypes. Using only immunohistochemistry criteria to predict response to anti-angiogenesis will not work because of tumor heterogeneity.


View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Community Practice Connections™: CDK4/6 Inhibitors With the Experts: The Role of Emerging Agents for the Management of Metastatic Breast CancerMay 30, 20182.0
Medical Crossfire®: Clinical Updates on PARP Inhibition and its Evolving Use in the Treatment of CancersMay 30, 20181.5
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