Dr. Shaw on Overcoming Resistance in Lung Cancer

Alice T. Shaw, MD, PhD
Published: Thursday, Apr 23, 2015



Alice Tsang Shaw, MD, PhD, thoracic oncologist, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, discusses overcoming resistance to targeted therapy in lung cancer.

Resistance is sometimes caused by new genetic changes in the target kinase itself. One common type of resistance occurs when a kinase acquires a new mutation so that the drug can no longer bind, explains Shaw. This often happens in EGFR-mutated lung cancer with the T790M “gatekeeper” mutation.

Secondary resistance mutations also occur in patients who have relapsed on anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors such as crizotinib, says Shaw. A better understanding of resistance at the genetic molecular level is needed to develop new treatments to overcome it, says Shaw.


Alice Tsang Shaw, MD, PhD, thoracic oncologist, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, discusses overcoming resistance to targeted therapy in lung cancer.

Resistance is sometimes caused by new genetic changes in the target kinase itself. One common type of resistance occurs when a kinase acquires a new mutation so that the drug can no longer bind, explains Shaw. This often happens in EGFR-mutated lung cancer with the T790M “gatekeeper” mutation.

Secondary resistance mutations also occur in patients who have relapsed on anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors such as crizotinib, says Shaw. A better understanding of resistance at the genetic molecular level is needed to develop new treatments to overcome it, says Shaw.

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Community Practice Connections™: 18th Annual International Lung Cancer Congress®Oct 31, 20181.5
Clinical Interchange™: Translating Research to Inform Changing Paradigms: Assessment of Emerging Immuno-Oncology Strategies and Combinations across Lung, Head and Neck, and Bladder CancersOct 31, 20182.0
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