Dr. Slovin on ADT-Associated Cardiac Complications in Prostate Cancer

Susan F. Slovin, MD, PhD
Published: Tuesday, Dec 04, 2018



Susan F. Slovin, MD, PhD, a medical oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, discusses androgen receptor therapy (ADT)-associated cardiac complications in prostate cancer.

There is increasing evidence that the use of ADT impacts the quality of life and cardiovascular health of patients with prostate cancer. Controversial evidence from retrospective studies suggests that ADT increases cardiovascular risk. The data that were extrapolated from the databases, however, failed to address this association, explains Slovin.

Over the last several years, the field of cardio-oncology has emerged, and is now seeking to address this question. Ongoing research suggests that there may be subtle differences in the use of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) agonist versus a GNRH antagonist, says Slovin. Preliminary data presented by Peter Albertson, MD, of UConn Health, looked at approximately 6 prospective trials and concluded that the use of a GNRH antagonist reduces the relative risk of a cardiovascular event by about 56% compared with the absolute risk reduction of about 8.4%.
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Susan F. Slovin, MD, PhD, a medical oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, discusses androgen receptor therapy (ADT)-associated cardiac complications in prostate cancer.

There is increasing evidence that the use of ADT impacts the quality of life and cardiovascular health of patients with prostate cancer. Controversial evidence from retrospective studies suggests that ADT increases cardiovascular risk. The data that were extrapolated from the databases, however, failed to address this association, explains Slovin.

Over the last several years, the field of cardio-oncology has emerged, and is now seeking to address this question. Ongoing research suggests that there may be subtle differences in the use of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) agonist versus a GNRH antagonist, says Slovin. Preliminary data presented by Peter Albertson, MD, of UConn Health, looked at approximately 6 prospective trials and concluded that the use of a GNRH antagonist reduces the relative risk of a cardiovascular event by about 56% compared with the absolute risk reduction of about 8.4%.



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