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Dr. Spector Discusses the Complexities of Cancer

Neil L. Spector, MD
Published: Monday, Mar 26, 2012

Neil L. Spector, MD, co-director, Experimental Therapeutics, Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, explains that the initial data received from genomic, mutation, and gene expression analyses have illuminated the hidden complexities of cancer.

Historically breast cancer has paved the way in the research of molecular subgroups. The subclassification of this disease continues to dive deeper and researchers are now looking at subtypes of the subtypes.

While research has advanced, the area of triple-negative breast cancer still requires a more thorough subanalysis in order to provide better care. For instance, if a cancer is androgen receptor-positive it is more likely to respond to anti-androgen therapies. This allows for the personalization of care by providing the therapy that is most likely to be effective, based on genetics.

Tools are currently available to find the subsets that will likely respond to any given targeted therapy. This approach will help researchers pinpoint the targets that may or may not have an established therapy.

Neil L. Spector, MD, co-director, Experimental Therapeutics, Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, explains that the initial data received from genomic, mutation, and gene expression analyses have illuminated the hidden complexities of cancer.

Historically breast cancer has paved the way in the research of molecular subgroups. The subclassification of this disease continues to dive deeper and researchers are now looking at subtypes of the subtypes.

While research has advanced, the area of triple-negative breast cancer still requires a more thorough subanalysis in order to provide better care. For instance, if a cancer is androgen receptor-positive it is more likely to respond to anti-androgen therapies. This allows for the personalization of care by providing the therapy that is most likely to be effective, based on genetics.

Tools are currently available to find the subsets that will likely respond to any given targeted therapy. This approach will help researchers pinpoint the targets that may or may not have an established therapy.


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34th Annual Miami Breast Cancer Conference® Clinical Case Vignette Series™May 25, 20182.0
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