Dr. Walsh Compares Open and Robotic-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy Operations

Patrick C. Walsh, MD
Published: Wednesday, Feb 18, 2015



Patrick C. Walsh, MD, university distinguished service professor of urology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, discusses radical prostatectomy operations in the traditional open and robotic-assisted form.

Both operations' procedures require knowing the locations of the sphincter, venous drainage, nerves, and fascial structure that covers the prostate. Walsh, who has vast experience performing open prostatectomies, says the standard procedure can be difficult and requires a significant amount of training.

Mani Menon, MD, from the Henry Ford Vattikuti Urology Institute, pioneered robotic prostatectomy after having difficulties with the laparoscopic procedure.

At Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, approximately 60% of patients choose robotic prostatectomy, and 40% choose the open operation. Walsh adds there is no evidence that suggests robotic prostatectomy is more effective than its open counterpart. However, it has allowed doctors to perform prostatectomies who could not do so laparoscopically, due to increased intraabdominal pressure and blood loss.


Patrick C. Walsh, MD, university distinguished service professor of urology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, discusses radical prostatectomy operations in the traditional open and robotic-assisted form.

Both operations' procedures require knowing the locations of the sphincter, venous drainage, nerves, and fascial structure that covers the prostate. Walsh, who has vast experience performing open prostatectomies, says the standard procedure can be difficult and requires a significant amount of training.

Mani Menon, MD, from the Henry Ford Vattikuti Urology Institute, pioneered robotic prostatectomy after having difficulties with the laparoscopic procedure.

At Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, approximately 60% of patients choose robotic prostatectomy, and 40% choose the open operation. Walsh adds there is no evidence that suggests robotic prostatectomy is more effective than its open counterpart. However, it has allowed doctors to perform prostatectomies who could not do so laparoscopically, due to increased intraabdominal pressure and blood loss.



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