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Dr. Weber on Genetic Testing for Patients with Melanoma

Jeffrey S. Weber, MD, PhD
Published: Monday, Oct 14, 2013

Jeffrey S. Weber, MD, PhD, medical oncologist, Department of Cutaneous Oncology, director, Donald A. Adam Comprehensive Melanoma Research Center, Moffitt Cancer Center, discusses testing for genetic mutations in patients with melanoma.

Weber says that patients with melanoma should be tested for gene mutations any time it will impact care or enrollment on a clinical trial. Patients with stage III melanoma or higher and every patient with metastatic melanoma are tested at the Moffitt Cancer Center to determine eligibility and/or treatment off trials.

The amount of genetic mutations that physicians test for has increased over time, Weber says, and in the future, physicians will be able to get a full genetic characterization of a tumor. Physicians will use these tests to get an idea of the genetic changes that are going on in the circulating tumor DNA. This information, Weber says, will inform physicians on how they need to use therapy in an adaptive manner.

Weber thinks that this new adaptive approach will allow physicians to keep patients alive longer and even cure more patients.

Jeffrey S. Weber, MD, PhD, medical oncologist, Department of Cutaneous Oncology, director, Donald A. Adam Comprehensive Melanoma Research Center, Moffitt Cancer Center, discusses testing for genetic mutations in patients with melanoma.

Weber says that patients with melanoma should be tested for gene mutations any time it will impact care or enrollment on a clinical trial. Patients with stage III melanoma or higher and every patient with metastatic melanoma are tested at the Moffitt Cancer Center to determine eligibility and/or treatment off trials.

The amount of genetic mutations that physicians test for has increased over time, Weber says, and in the future, physicians will be able to get a full genetic characterization of a tumor. Physicians will use these tests to get an idea of the genetic changes that are going on in the circulating tumor DNA. This information, Weber says, will inform physicians on how they need to use therapy in an adaptive manner.

Weber thinks that this new adaptive approach will allow physicians to keep patients alive longer and even cure more patients.




View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Community Practice Connections™: Precision Medicine for Community Oncologists: Assessing the Role of Tumor-Testing Technologies in Cancer CareNov 30, 20181.0
35th Annual Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium: Innovative Cancer Therapy for Tomorrow® Clinical Vignette SeriesJan 31, 20192.0
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