Dr. Weber on Molecular Testing in Melanoma

Jeffrey S. Weber, MD, PhD
Published: Monday, Mar 23, 2015



Jeffrey Weber, MD, PhD, a senior member at the Moffitt Cancer Center, discusses the significance of molecular testing for patients with melanoma and when testing should occur.

Patients with high-risk, metastatic, and/or stage III melanoma should have molecular testing routinely performed, Weber explains. Molecular testing should first occur at the initial diagnosis of metastatic disease, as well as local regional recurrent disease.

At Moffitt Cancer Center, oncologists conduct a panel of 40-50 genes, which allows the academic center to reuse for data purposes over time. KIT, BRAF, and RAS mutations are the known actionable mutations in melanoma.
 


Jeffrey Weber, MD, PhD, a senior member at the Moffitt Cancer Center, discusses the significance of molecular testing for patients with melanoma and when testing should occur.

Patients with high-risk, metastatic, and/or stage III melanoma should have molecular testing routinely performed, Weber explains. Molecular testing should first occur at the initial diagnosis of metastatic disease, as well as local regional recurrent disease.

At Moffitt Cancer Center, oncologists conduct a panel of 40-50 genes, which allows the academic center to reuse for data purposes over time. KIT, BRAF, and RAS mutations are the known actionable mutations in melanoma.
 



View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Medical Crossfire®: Evolving Roles for Targeted Melanoma Therapies: Assessing Rapid Progress in the Field and Looking Toward Future CombinationsFeb 28, 20191.5
Advances in™ Melanoma: Exploring BRAF/MEK in Adjuvant and Neoadjuvant SettingsSep 28, 20191.5
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