Dr. William Oh Discusses Dasatinib in Metastatic CRPC

William K. Oh, MD
Published: Wednesday, Feb 27, 2013

William K. Oh, MD, Chief of the Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, the Tisch Cancer Institute at Mount Sinai Medical Center, discusses findings from the READY trial that added dasatinib to docetaxel as a treatment for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).

In the phase III trial, 1522 patients were randomized 1:1 to receive docetaxel plus dasatinib or docetaxel and a placebo. Prior to the study, preclinical evidence suggested that SRC inhibitors, such as dasatinib, could target osteoclast activation to prevent prostate cancer growth and bone metastases. However, findings from the READY trial did not demonstrate any advantage for the addition of dasatinib to standard chemotherapy, Oh notes.

In the trial, overall survival was 21.5 months for the combination compared to 21.2 for docetaxel alone. Moreover, no difference was observed in subgroup analyses, including in groups of patients receiving bisphosphonates. Oh adds that secondary endpoints were also not significantly improved, including urinary N-telopeptide, which is an indicator of bone turnover.

William K. Oh, MD, Chief of the Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, the Tisch Cancer Institute at Mount Sinai Medical Center, discusses findings from the READY trial that added dasatinib to docetaxel as a treatment for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).

In the phase III trial, 1522 patients were randomized 1:1 to receive docetaxel plus dasatinib or docetaxel and a placebo. Prior to the study, preclinical evidence suggested that SRC inhibitors, such as dasatinib, could target osteoclast activation to prevent prostate cancer growth and bone metastases. However, findings from the READY trial did not demonstrate any advantage for the addition of dasatinib to standard chemotherapy, Oh notes.

In the trial, overall survival was 21.5 months for the combination compared to 21.2 for docetaxel alone. Moreover, no difference was observed in subgroup analyses, including in groups of patients receiving bisphosphonates. Oh adds that secondary endpoints were also not significantly improved, including urinary N-telopeptide, which is an indicator of bone turnover.


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