Dr. Wright on Measuring Progression and Recurrence in Ovarian Cancer

Jason D. Wright, MD
Published: Monday, Feb 16, 2015



Jason D. Wright, MD, Division Chief, Gynecologic Oncology, Associate Clinical Professor of Gynecologic Oncology, Sol Goldman Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University, discusses the challenges in measuring progression and recurrence in patients with ovarian cancer.

CT imaging is the traditional method of tracking progression and recurrence in ovarian cancer, but Wright explains this poses several issues. Interpreted CT scan results vary amongst radiologists, which ultimately demonstrates a lack of reliability.

Traditional clinical trials have also used imaging to define recurrence in this disease. Though blood marker CA-125 is found in a great concentration of ovarian cancer cells and is likely to appear abnormal prior to a CT scan, oncologists are unsure how to use it as a marker of recurrence in ovarian cancer.


Jason D. Wright, MD, Division Chief, Gynecologic Oncology, Associate Clinical Professor of Gynecologic Oncology, Sol Goldman Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University, discusses the challenges in measuring progression and recurrence in patients with ovarian cancer.

CT imaging is the traditional method of tracking progression and recurrence in ovarian cancer, but Wright explains this poses several issues. Interpreted CT scan results vary amongst radiologists, which ultimately demonstrates a lack of reliability.

Traditional clinical trials have also used imaging to define recurrence in this disease. Though blood marker CA-125 is found in a great concentration of ovarian cancer cells and is likely to appear abnormal prior to a CT scan, oncologists are unsure how to use it as a marker of recurrence in ovarian cancer.

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