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Prostate Cancer Screening and Early Detection, Part I

Panelists: Mark S. Austenfeld, MD, Kansas City Urology Care; Raoul S. Concepcion, MD, Urology Associates, PC; E. David Crawford, MD, University of Colorado;
Published: Friday, Aug 24, 2012


With multiple new therapies entering the prostate cancer arena the continued emphasis has been placed on developing pathways to help identify, treat, and monitor patients. However, identifying early-stage patients who are likely to fail definitive therapy remains troublesome, since there are no firm guidelines or protocols. Additionally, the recent controversial recommendation from the United States Preventive Service Task Force (USPSTF) on PSA screening has added further complications.

E. David Crawford, MD, believes the bottom-line of the USPSTF decision on PSA screening is that diagnosis and treatment need to be separated to avoid treating early-stage patients who do not need therapy. Pathways need to be developed that accurately identify the individuals who need to be screened and treated, to avoid overdiagnosis and overtreatment. Additionally, Crawford suggests screening can be done less frequently and can be reduced from once a year to as infrequently as every five years.

View >>> Prostate Cancer Screening and Early Detection, Part II.
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With multiple new therapies entering the prostate cancer arena the continued emphasis has been placed on developing pathways to help identify, treat, and monitor patients. However, identifying early-stage patients who are likely to fail definitive therapy remains troublesome, since there are no firm guidelines or protocols. Additionally, the recent controversial recommendation from the United States Preventive Service Task Force (USPSTF) on PSA screening has added further complications.

E. David Crawford, MD, believes the bottom-line of the USPSTF decision on PSA screening is that diagnosis and treatment need to be separated to avoid treating early-stage patients who do not need therapy. Pathways need to be developed that accurately identify the individuals who need to be screened and treated, to avoid overdiagnosis and overtreatment. Additionally, Crawford suggests screening can be done less frequently and can be reduced from once a year to as infrequently as every five years.

View >>> Prostate Cancer Screening and Early Detection, Part II.
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