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Prostate Cancer Screening and Early Detection, Part II

Panelists: Mark S. Austenfeld, MD, Kansas City Urology Care; Raoul S. Concepcion, MD, Urology Associates, PC; E. David Crawford, MD, University of Colorado;
Published: Monday, Aug 27, 2012


In the second segment of this series on PSA screening and early-detection for men with prostate cancer, panelists Mark S. Austenfeld, MD, addresses the comments made by E. David Crawford, MD, in the first part of this series (View >>> Prostate Cancer Screening and Early Detection, Part I.

Austenfeld believes that the United States Preventive Service Task Force (USPSTF) did not make the correct recommendation for PSA screening. Austenfeld holds the position that ample evidence did not exist to recommend against PSA screening; however, he agrees with Crawford that overdiagnosis and overtreatment need to be addressed.

PSA screening can be associated with many positive statistics, such as lower death rates, Austenfeld notes. Additionally, he believes that the recommendation did not pay adequate attention to the opinions given during the advisory period, particularly those from the American Urological Association.

Crawford clarifies that he does not feel that the USPSTF decision was completely accurate and that he believes it will likely need to be adjusted, in the future. Moderator Raoul S. Concepcion, MD, adds that he believes that overtreatment and overdiagnosis should not go hand in hand and that many men deserve to know early on that they have prostate cancer, even if it does not require treatment. However, Crawford points out that once men discover that they have prostate cancer they will immediately want some type of treatment.

View >>> Prostate Cancer Screening and Early Detection, Part I

View >>> Prostate Cancer Screening and Early Detection, Part III
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In the second segment of this series on PSA screening and early-detection for men with prostate cancer, panelists Mark S. Austenfeld, MD, addresses the comments made by E. David Crawford, MD, in the first part of this series (View >>> Prostate Cancer Screening and Early Detection, Part I.

Austenfeld believes that the United States Preventive Service Task Force (USPSTF) did not make the correct recommendation for PSA screening. Austenfeld holds the position that ample evidence did not exist to recommend against PSA screening; however, he agrees with Crawford that overdiagnosis and overtreatment need to be addressed.

PSA screening can be associated with many positive statistics, such as lower death rates, Austenfeld notes. Additionally, he believes that the recommendation did not pay adequate attention to the opinions given during the advisory period, particularly those from the American Urological Association.

Crawford clarifies that he does not feel that the USPSTF decision was completely accurate and that he believes it will likely need to be adjusted, in the future. Moderator Raoul S. Concepcion, MD, adds that he believes that overtreatment and overdiagnosis should not go hand in hand and that many men deserve to know early on that they have prostate cancer, even if it does not require treatment. However, Crawford points out that once men discover that they have prostate cancer they will immediately want some type of treatment.

View >>> Prostate Cancer Screening and Early Detection, Part I

View >>> Prostate Cancer Screening and Early Detection, Part III
View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Clinical Interchange™: Translating Research to Inform Changing Paradigms: Assessment of Emerging Immuno-Oncology Strategies and Combinations across Lung, Head and Neck, and Bladder CancersOct 31, 20182.0
35th Annual Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium: Innovative Cancer Therapy for Tomorrow® Clinical Vignette SeriesJan 31, 20192.0
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