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Prostate Cancer Screening and Early Detection, Part III

Panelists: Mark S. Austenfeld, MD, Kansas City Urology Care; Raoul S. Concepcion, MD, Urology Associates, PC; E. David Crawford, MD, University of Colorado;
Published: Tuesday, Aug 28, 2012


Continuing the previous discussion on prostate cancer screening, Neal D. Shore, MD, describes how the recent United States Preventive Service Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on PSA testing has affected his practice. (View other discussions.)

Shore believes the recommendation was made without any forethought to how it would be received and interpreted by the public. As a result, he feels many patients have completely discredited PSA testing, which he does not feel was the goal of the USPSTF decision.

Ultimately, an increase in patients with high-risk factors who do not receive appropriate diagnosis and screening could increase the number of patients presenting with advanced prostate cancer. Shore does not believe a one-size-fits-all recommendation is the best approach and guidance is needed to better determine who should be screened, diagnosed, and biopsied.

In general, panelist Paul R. Sieber, MD, concurs with Shore, adding that the USPSTF recommendation has added an extra burden to his daily practice.

View >>> PSA Screening, Part I

View >>> PSA Screening, Part II
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Continuing the previous discussion on prostate cancer screening, Neal D. Shore, MD, describes how the recent United States Preventive Service Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on PSA testing has affected his practice. (View other discussions.)

Shore believes the recommendation was made without any forethought to how it would be received and interpreted by the public. As a result, he feels many patients have completely discredited PSA testing, which he does not feel was the goal of the USPSTF decision.

Ultimately, an increase in patients with high-risk factors who do not receive appropriate diagnosis and screening could increase the number of patients presenting with advanced prostate cancer. Shore does not believe a one-size-fits-all recommendation is the best approach and guidance is needed to better determine who should be screened, diagnosed, and biopsied.

In general, panelist Paul R. Sieber, MD, concurs with Shore, adding that the USPSTF recommendation has added an extra burden to his daily practice.

View >>> PSA Screening, Part I

View >>> PSA Screening, Part II
View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Community Practice Connections™: Personalized Sequencing in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Bridging the Latest Evidence to the Bedside in Clinical ManagementAug 25, 20181.5
Community Practice Connections™: Precision Medicine for Community Oncologists: Assessing the Role of Tumor-Testing Technologies in Cancer CareNov 30, 20181.0
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