Search Videos by Topic or Participant
Browse by Series:

Case Study: Treating Papillary Thyroid Cancer

Panelists: Marcia S. Brose, MD, PhD, UPenn; Naifa L. Busaidy, MD, MD Anderson;Gary L. Clayman, DMD, MD, MD Anderson; Ezra Cohen, MD, UCSD;
Published: Wednesday, Sep 03, 2014
For High-Definition, Click
Marcia S. Brose, MD, PhD, presents a case study focused on a woman diagnosed with papillary thyroid cancer at age 35. Following surgery and the administration of radioactive iodine (RAI), the woman remained disease free for 8 years, at which point she developed multiple pulmonary metastases and bulky disease in the neck.

At this point, the patient was seen by an endocrinologist and a whole body scan was conducted, in order to determine if the patient was RAI-responsive, Brose noted. Following these tests, the patient was deemed RAI-refractory. Scans were conducted every 3 months, which revealed rapid tumor growth.

Surgery was utilized to reduce the disease burden in the neck. After this, since high-risk factors were not present, the initiation of systemic therapy was delayed, based on patient preference. Following a few months, sorafenib was administered for 3 years, producing a strong response, Brose notes.

Ascertaining whether a patient is RAI-refractory is important for a patient who presents with metastatic disease, to prevent unnecessary systemic therapy, notes Naifa L. Busaidy, MD. To further address this issue, cross-sectional imaging and full body scans should be conducted to assess whether RAI is being taken up when it is initially administered, Brose believes. 
Slider Left
Slider Right
For High-Definition, Click
Marcia S. Brose, MD, PhD, presents a case study focused on a woman diagnosed with papillary thyroid cancer at age 35. Following surgery and the administration of radioactive iodine (RAI), the woman remained disease free for 8 years, at which point she developed multiple pulmonary metastases and bulky disease in the neck.

At this point, the patient was seen by an endocrinologist and a whole body scan was conducted, in order to determine if the patient was RAI-responsive, Brose noted. Following these tests, the patient was deemed RAI-refractory. Scans were conducted every 3 months, which revealed rapid tumor growth.

Surgery was utilized to reduce the disease burden in the neck. After this, since high-risk factors were not present, the initiation of systemic therapy was delayed, based on patient preference. Following a few months, sorafenib was administered for 3 years, producing a strong response, Brose notes.

Ascertaining whether a patient is RAI-refractory is important for a patient who presents with metastatic disease, to prevent unnecessary systemic therapy, notes Naifa L. Busaidy, MD. To further address this issue, cross-sectional imaging and full body scans should be conducted to assess whether RAI is being taken up when it is initially administered, Brose believes. 
View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Community Practice Connections™: CDK4/6 Inhibitors With the Experts: The Role of Emerging Agents for the Management of Metastatic Breast CancerMay 30, 20182.0
Medical Crossfire®: Clinical Updates on PARP Inhibition and its Evolving Use in the Treatment of CancersMay 30, 20181.5
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x