Search Videos by Topic or Participant
Browse by Series:

Bone Health Programs in Urology Practices, Part II

Panelists: Mark S. Austenfeld, MD, Kansas City Urology Care; Raoul S. Concepcion, MD, Urology Associates, PC; E. David Crawford, MD, University of Colorado;
Published: Wednesday, Aug 08, 2012


The role of the urologist in maintaining optimal bone health for men receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is an important topic that has been addressed by the American Urological Association (AUA).

As part of the AUA Male Health Committee, panelist Neal D. Shore, MD, addresses many of the AUA initiatives underway to ensure that appropriate counseling is provided for patients receiving ADT. This may include advice on vitamin D, calcium supplementation, checking baseline vitamin D and calcium levels, educational materials on avoidance of a sedentary lifestyle, active and regular core strengthening exercises, and even changes in footwear.

Another panelist from a large urology group practice, Mark S. Austenfeld, MD, provides insight into incorporating the AUA initiatives into practice. Austenfeld explained that there are many potential complications with ADT, including metabolic syndrome. These conditions can be better managed and tracked using electronic health records (EHRs) that allow urologists to follow and collect data on how treatments or preventive measures are received by patients. Austenfeld feels the use of EHRs to monitor men's health provides an opportunity to objectively determine the impact urologists are having on patient outcomes.

View Bone Health Programs in Urology Practices, Part I
Slider Left
Slider Right


The role of the urologist in maintaining optimal bone health for men receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is an important topic that has been addressed by the American Urological Association (AUA).

As part of the AUA Male Health Committee, panelist Neal D. Shore, MD, addresses many of the AUA initiatives underway to ensure that appropriate counseling is provided for patients receiving ADT. This may include advice on vitamin D, calcium supplementation, checking baseline vitamin D and calcium levels, educational materials on avoidance of a sedentary lifestyle, active and regular core strengthening exercises, and even changes in footwear.

Another panelist from a large urology group practice, Mark S. Austenfeld, MD, provides insight into incorporating the AUA initiatives into practice. Austenfeld explained that there are many potential complications with ADT, including metabolic syndrome. These conditions can be better managed and tracked using electronic health records (EHRs) that allow urologists to follow and collect data on how treatments or preventive measures are received by patients. Austenfeld feels the use of EHRs to monitor men's health provides an opportunity to objectively determine the impact urologists are having on patient outcomes.

View Bone Health Programs in Urology Practices, Part I
View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Clinical Interchange™: Translating Research to Inform Changing Paradigms: Assessment of Emerging Immuno-Oncology Strategies and Combinations across Lung, Head and Neck, and Bladder CancersOct 31, 20182.0
35th Annual Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium: Innovative Cancer Therapy for Tomorrow® Clinical Vignette SeriesJan 31, 20192.0
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x