New Agents Push the Envelope in Ovarian Cancer

Susana M. Campos, MD, MPH
Published: Sunday, Feb 10, 2019
Susana M. Campos, MD
Susana M. Campos, MD
Ovarian cancer is the fifth overall cause of cancer death in women, and it represents 5% of all cancers in women. Most women with ovarian cancer present with stage III or IV disease, which contributes to the high mortality rate. Although there have been numerous studies evaluating the role of different therapy schedules, cytotoxic agents, and routes of administration, the backbone of therapy remains a combination of a platinum and a taxane.

Despite these encouraging results, the addition of bevacizumab in the overall population did not result in improvement in overall survival (OS). Therefore, innovative combinations in the up-front setting of patients with ovarian cancer remain a high priority.

Parp Inhibitors

Recently, treatment in the landscape of ovarian cancer has changed. Notably, PARP inhibitors have been approved for the treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer. In 2014, olaparib (Lynparza) was approved for patients who carried a deleterious BRCA germline mutation and had received 3 or more prior lines of chemotherapy.3 Rucaparib (Rubraca)4 was approved as single-agent maintenance therapy for patients with germline or somatic BRCA mutations.

Table. 1 Ongoing Studies of PARP Inhibitors in Newly Diagnosed Ovarian Cancer

Table. 1 Ongoing Studies of PARP Inhibitors in Newly Diagnosed Ovarian Cancer

Table 2. Ongoing Studies of PARP Inhibitors Combined With Checkpoint Inhibitors in Newly Diagnosed Ovarian Cancer

Table 2. Ongoing Studies of PARP Inhibitors Combined With Checkpoint Inhibitors in Newly Diagnosed Ovarian Cancer After a median follow-up of 41 months, the risk of disease progression or death was 70% lower with olaparib than with placebo. The HR for disease progression or death was 0.30 (95% CI, 0.23-0.41; P <.001).9,10

).

Checkpoint Inhibitors

In the past several years, there has been tremendous benefit from the clinical implementation of checkpoint inhibitors, which have been approved for treatment of melanoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, and bladder, kidney, and lung cancers. However, the role of checkpoint inhibitors in ovarian cancer is undefined. Several questions remain: What effect can the immune system have on ovarian cancer? What factors contribute to ovarian cancer immunogenicity? What role does PD-L1 play in ovarian cancer?


... to read the full story
To Read the Full Story

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Oncology Briefings™: Current Perspectives on Preventing and Managing Tumor Lysis SyndromeJun 30, 20191.0
Community Practice Connections™: 2nd Annual International Congress on Oncology Pathology™Aug 31, 20191.5
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x