Flash Findings: Cancer Facts

By Matthew Mahady
Published: Tuesday, Jul 06, 2010
Mortality

•  This year, 559,650 Americans are projected to die of cancer, perishing at a daily rate of approximately 1,500.

   Source: American Cancer Society

•  Cancer is considered to be the second-largest reason for death in the U.S. after heart disease, with roughly one in

   every four deaths linked to some form of cancer.

   Source: American Cancer Society

•  About seven million people die of cancer each year worldwide. If current trends continue, by 2020 more than 10 

   million people could die from the disease.

   Source: International Union Against Cancer

•  The developing world will bear the brunt of increased cancer fatality rates. By 2020, three quarters of cancer deaths 

   will occur in the developing world.

   Source: International Union Against Cancer

Incidence

•  The annual incidence of cancer is expected to increase about 50% to 15 million cases annually by 2020.

   Source: World Health Organization

Breast Cancer

•   An estimated 178,500 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to occur among women in the U.S. in 2007.

•   Roughly 62,000 cases of non-invasive (in situ) breast cancer are expected to occur among women in 2007.

•   After decades of annual increases, breast cancer incidence has leveled off over the past several years.

•   Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women.

•   Roughly 2,030 cases of new male breast cancer are expected in 2007.

    Source: American Cancer Society

Cancer Costs

•   In 2006, the overall costs of cancer were $206.3 billion.

•   Direct medical cancer costs (total health expenditures) exceeded $78.2 billion.

    Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH)

•   Cancer Costs $17.9 billion in indirect morbidity (costs of lost productivity due to illness) and $110.2 billion in indirect 

    mortality (costs of lost productivity due to premature death).

    Source: American Cancer Society

Smoking and Cancer

•   Smoking is the main cause of cancer in the world and the main cause of death in adult life.

•   Annually, about one million people in the United States take up smoking. Worldwide, roughly 30 million people

    begin smoking each year.

    Source: Deathfromsmoking.net

  All cancers caused by cigarette smoking could be prevented completely. • It is estimated that in 2007, 168,000     

    cancer fatalities are expected to be caused by smoking.

    Source: American Cancer Society

Smoking and Cancer  
Chances of lung cancer in men who stop

smoking at age 50
6%
Chances of lung cancer in men who

continue to smoke past age 50
16%
Chances of cancer of the pharynx,

esophagus, and larynx in men who stop

smoking at age 50
3%
Chances of cancer of the pharynx,

esophagus, and larynx in men who

continue to smoke past age 50
6.4%
Sources: British Medical Journal and the American Journal of Epidemiology

Cancer and Minorities

•   The death rate from cancer among African-American males is 38% higher than the death rate of Caucasians.

•   The death rate from cancer among African-American females is 17% higher than the death rate of Caucasians.

    Source: American Cancer Society

Oncology Marketplace

•   Over the next several years, the global cancer market is predicted to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) 

    exceeding 10%.

    Source: Datamonitor

•  
The global market for cancer innovatives has more than tripled in size over the last four years, achieving a CAGR of

    33.1% between 2003 and 2006.


View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Community Practice Connections™: 18th Annual International Lung Cancer Congress®Oct 31, 20181.5
Clinical Interchange™: Translating Research to Inform Changing Paradigms: Assessment of Emerging Immuno-Oncology Strategies and Combinations across Lung, Head and Neck, and Bladder CancersOct 31, 20182.0
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