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Specialized Pediatric Palliative Care Teams Reduce High-Intensity Care at End of Life

Jason Harris
Published: Wednesday, Jan 24, 2018

Erica C. Kaye, MD

Erica C. Kaye, MD
The presence of a specialized pediatric palliative care (SPPC) team lowered the odds that a child with cancer would be admitted to an intensive care unit at the end of life by five-fold compared with those who did not receive palliative care, according to results from a retrospective study conducted in Canada.1

“These data provide tangible justification upon which to build advocacy efforts for the creation and expansion of specialized pediatric palliative care teams and programs,” she said. “These findings are also immediately applicable to clinician training and educational initiatives that aim to improve overall clinical care for children with high-risk cancer.”

References

  1. Widger K, Sutradhar R, Rapopart A, et al. Predictors of specialized pediatric palliative care involvement and impact on patterns of end-of-life care in children with cancer [published online January 22, 2018]. J Clin Oncol. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2017. 75.6312.
  2. Kaye EC. Understanding the 'value-added' by specialized pediatric palliative care teams in the care of children with cancer at the end of life [podcast]. J Clin Oncol. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2017. 75.6312.

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