Dr. Berk on the Role of Hospitals Versus Independents

Seth Berk, MD
Published Online: Thursday, Dec 01, 2016



As insurers and the federal government look for ways to reduce costs in oncology, the division of care between large, academic institutions and smaller providers is undergoing a process of change, says Seth Berk, MD, chair of the Financial Audit Committee for Regional Cancer Care Associates (RCCA) and a Mount Holly, New Jersey, specialist in internal medicine, hematology and oncology.

The broad availability of general oncology care and expanding access to clinical trials through independent oncological centers offer a significant financial benefit to all patients and to the healthcare system, but large institutions have an important role to perform in the provision of specialized services that may be beyond the reach of smaller centers, Berk noted during this OncLive.com interview at the 2016 RCCA annual meeting, November 19 in Princeton, New Jersey.

Those services include bone marrow transplants and surgeries for rare tumors for which knowledgeable physicians may not be available in a smaller clinical setting. Large institutions are more likely to have the expertise on hand for handling rare cases that may not have standard approaches. Such care rightly belongs in larger venues, Berk said.


As insurers and the federal government look for ways to reduce costs in oncology, the division of care between large, academic institutions and smaller providers is undergoing a process of change, says Seth Berk, MD, chair of the Financial Audit Committee for Regional Cancer Care Associates (RCCA) and a Mount Holly, New Jersey, specialist in internal medicine, hematology and oncology.

The broad availability of general oncology care and expanding access to clinical trials through independent oncological centers offer a significant financial benefit to all patients and to the healthcare system, but large institutions have an important role to perform in the provision of specialized services that may be beyond the reach of smaller centers, Berk noted during this OncLive.com interview at the 2016 RCCA annual meeting, November 19 in Princeton, New Jersey.

Those services include bone marrow transplants and surgeries for rare tumors for which knowledgeable physicians may not be available in a smaller clinical setting. Large institutions are more likely to have the expertise on hand for handling rare cases that may not have standard approaches. Such care rightly belongs in larger venues, Berk said.



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