Dr. Brufsky on Cobimetinib Plus Paclitaxel in TNBC

Adam M. Brufsky, MD, PhD
Published Online: Tuesday, Jan 03, 2017



Adam M. Brufsky, MD, PhD, professor of Medicine, associate chief of Hematology/Oncology, co-director of the Comprehensive Breast Care Center, associate director of Clinical Investigation, University of Pittsburgh, discusses combining cobimetinib (Cotellic) and paclitaxel as a first-line treatment in patients with advanced triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC).

As a MEK inhibitor, cobimetinib may have effectiveness in breast cancer, since there are some growth factor pathways inhibited by MEK, Brufsky explains. Additionally, it is an agent approved by the FDA for patients with melanoma. Therefore, researchers contemplated whether there were possibilities within the basal-2 subtype of TNBC, which has growth factor-differentiating issues.

The COLET trial randomized patients with TNBC to weekly paclitaxel alone or combined with cobimetinib. Overall, there was very little toxicity reported with the combination, he adds. Responses were observed in the first 16 patients, and researchers are still analyzing the remainder of the data. There are approximately 90 patients currently enrolled on the trial.

Results also showed a response rate of around 50%, with a documented 20% to 30% of patients reported to have stable disease.


Adam M. Brufsky, MD, PhD, professor of Medicine, associate chief of Hematology/Oncology, co-director of the Comprehensive Breast Care Center, associate director of Clinical Investigation, University of Pittsburgh, discusses combining cobimetinib (Cotellic) and paclitaxel as a first-line treatment in patients with advanced triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC).

As a MEK inhibitor, cobimetinib may have effectiveness in breast cancer, since there are some growth factor pathways inhibited by MEK, Brufsky explains. Additionally, it is an agent approved by the FDA for patients with melanoma. Therefore, researchers contemplated whether there were possibilities within the basal-2 subtype of TNBC, which has growth factor-differentiating issues.

The COLET trial randomized patients with TNBC to weekly paclitaxel alone or combined with cobimetinib. Overall, there was very little toxicity reported with the combination, he adds. Responses were observed in the first 16 patients, and researchers are still analyzing the remainder of the data. There are approximately 90 patients currently enrolled on the trial.

Results also showed a response rate of around 50%, with a documented 20% to 30% of patients reported to have stable disease.

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