Dr. Oh Discusses Immunotherapy in Prostate Cancer

William K. Oh, MD
Published: Friday, Jan 12, 2018



William K. Oh, MD, chief, Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, professor of medicine and urology, Mount Sinai Hospital, discusses the role of immunotherapy for patients with prostate cancer.

Prostate cancer was one of the first diseases where immunotherapy was approved for use with the agent sipuleucel-T (Provenge). The checkpoint inhibitors do have a response rate in prostate cancer but it is modest, explains Oh. Small studies that have been completed suggest there is a response rate of 10% to 20%. Results from larger studies, such as the KEYNOTE-199, are needed to determine a more accurate response rate.

It is known that prostate cancer is not going to be like other diseases, such as melanoma or lung cancer, where there are high response rates to immunotherapy. However, there is hope that combinations will make a difference, particularly combinations with vaccines, such as sipuleucel-T and checkpoint inhibitors.

The role of PD-L1 staining remains an unclear biomarker for predicting response or benefit from checkpoint inhibitors. However, in the future there is going to be more work done with immunotherapy, says Oh.



William K. Oh, MD, chief, Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, professor of medicine and urology, Mount Sinai Hospital, discusses the role of immunotherapy for patients with prostate cancer.

Prostate cancer was one of the first diseases where immunotherapy was approved for use with the agent sipuleucel-T (Provenge). The checkpoint inhibitors do have a response rate in prostate cancer but it is modest, explains Oh. Small studies that have been completed suggest there is a response rate of 10% to 20%. Results from larger studies, such as the KEYNOTE-199, are needed to determine a more accurate response rate.

It is known that prostate cancer is not going to be like other diseases, such as melanoma or lung cancer, where there are high response rates to immunotherapy. However, there is hope that combinations will make a difference, particularly combinations with vaccines, such as sipuleucel-T and checkpoint inhibitors.

The role of PD-L1 staining remains an unclear biomarker for predicting response or benefit from checkpoint inhibitors. However, in the future there is going to be more work done with immunotherapy, says Oh.


View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Clinical Vignette Series: 34th Annual Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium: Innovative Cancer Therapy for Tomorrow®Feb 28, 20182.0
Community Practice Connections™: Personalized Sequencing in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Bridging the Latest Evidence to the Bedside in Clinical ManagementAug 25, 20181.5
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