Dr. Coleman on Immunotherapy in Ovarian Cancer

Robert Coleman, MD
Published: Thursday, Aug 23, 2018



Robert Coleman, MD, professor in the department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses ongoing research with immunotherapy in ovarian cancer.

Single-agent immunotherapy has shown modest responses of 10% to 15% in ovarian cancer, but research efforts continue to investigate immunotherapeutic strategies, explains Coleman. Based on the TOPACIO trial, in which niraparib (Zejula) was combined with pembrolizumab (Keytruda), physicians believe that the combination of a PARP inhibitor and a PD-L1 inhibitor may increase responses rates in patients.

Another strategy, says Coleman, is identifying patient subgroups who are the most likely to benefit, such as those with BRCA mutations. These strategies coupled with novel therapies such as the use of stereotactic radiation and angiogenesis inhibitors may prove beneficial. Additionally, work looking into the tumor microenvironment may give physicians the opportunity to introduce new agents that can overcome the tumor dynamic that is limiting response to these drugs, states Coleman.
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Robert Coleman, MD, professor in the department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses ongoing research with immunotherapy in ovarian cancer.

Single-agent immunotherapy has shown modest responses of 10% to 15% in ovarian cancer, but research efforts continue to investigate immunotherapeutic strategies, explains Coleman. Based on the TOPACIO trial, in which niraparib (Zejula) was combined with pembrolizumab (Keytruda), physicians believe that the combination of a PARP inhibitor and a PD-L1 inhibitor may increase responses rates in patients.

Another strategy, says Coleman, is identifying patient subgroups who are the most likely to benefit, such as those with BRCA mutations. These strategies coupled with novel therapies such as the use of stereotactic radiation and angiogenesis inhibitors may prove beneficial. Additionally, work looking into the tumor microenvironment may give physicians the opportunity to introduce new agents that can overcome the tumor dynamic that is limiting response to these drugs, states Coleman.



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Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
35th Annual Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium: Innovative Cancer Therapy for Tomorrow® Clinical Vignette SeriesJan 31, 20192.0
Oncology Briefings™: Current Perspectives on Preventing and Managing Tumor Lysis SyndromeJun 30, 20191.0
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