Dr. Bruce D. Cheson on Obinutuzumab/ Bendamustine Survival Benefit in iNHL

Bruce D. Cheson, MD
Published: Thursday, Jul 23, 2015



Bruce D. Cheson, MD, Professor of Medicine, Head of Hematology, Deputy Chief, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Georgetown University Hospital, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, discusses the phase III GADOLIN study, which looks at the anti-CD20 agent obinutuzumab (Gazyva) and bendamustine compared with bendamustine alone in patients with relapsed indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (iNHL).

The combination of obinutuzumab and bendamustine did not improve response compared to bendamustine-alone in iNHL patients, said Cheson. However, progression-free survival (PFS) was significantly prolonged with the addition of obinutuzumab, with approximately 15 months median PFS in the bendamustine-only arm and not yet reached medium PFS after just over 20 months in the combination arm.

There were some dosing imbalances between the two arms, which are important to consider, said Cheson. In the combination arm bendamustine was given at 90 mg/m2 days one and two, while versus 120 mg/m2 days one and two in the single-agent arm. It is not clear whether this dosing variation made a difference in the response rates, but it could be responsible for the lack of improved response in the combination arm, said Cheson.



Bruce D. Cheson, MD, Professor of Medicine, Head of Hematology, Deputy Chief, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Georgetown University Hospital, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, discusses the phase III GADOLIN study, which looks at the anti-CD20 agent obinutuzumab (Gazyva) and bendamustine compared with bendamustine alone in patients with relapsed indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (iNHL).

The combination of obinutuzumab and bendamustine did not improve response compared to bendamustine-alone in iNHL patients, said Cheson. However, progression-free survival (PFS) was significantly prolonged with the addition of obinutuzumab, with approximately 15 months median PFS in the bendamustine-only arm and not yet reached medium PFS after just over 20 months in the combination arm.

There were some dosing imbalances between the two arms, which are important to consider, said Cheson. In the combination arm bendamustine was given at 90 mg/m2 days one and two, while versus 120 mg/m2 days one and two in the single-agent arm. It is not clear whether this dosing variation made a difference in the response rates, but it could be responsible for the lack of improved response in the combination arm, said Cheson.


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