Dr. Choi on Evolution of RT in Prostate Cancer

Seungtaek L. Choi, MD
Published: Friday, Mar 10, 2017



Seungtaek L. Choi, MD, an assistant professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology, and clinical Medical Director, Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses how radiation therapy (RT) has evolved for the treatment of patients with prostate cancer.

The biggest change in RT is that the treatments have more doses directly to the prostate cancer, Choi explains. There is definitely less doses to the rectum and the bladder, as well as a decreased risk of side effects.

Unfortunately, with prostate cancer, it takes physicians 5 to 7 years to see the actual cure rate, he adds. However, the side effects often occur in the first 2 to 5 years. In addition, there have been less reports of rectal and bladder irritation, and the risk of urinary incontinence is very low at less than 1%.

Now, physicians are seeing cure rates in patients with very low prostate-specific antigen (PSA) as it now goes to 0. This compares similar with surgical outcomes, Choi says.
 


Seungtaek L. Choi, MD, an assistant professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology, and clinical Medical Director, Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses how radiation therapy (RT) has evolved for the treatment of patients with prostate cancer.

The biggest change in RT is that the treatments have more doses directly to the prostate cancer, Choi explains. There is definitely less doses to the rectum and the bladder, as well as a decreased risk of side effects.

Unfortunately, with prostate cancer, it takes physicians 5 to 7 years to see the actual cure rate, he adds. However, the side effects often occur in the first 2 to 5 years. In addition, there have been less reports of rectal and bladder irritation, and the risk of urinary incontinence is very low at less than 1%.

Now, physicians are seeing cure rates in patients with very low prostate-specific antigen (PSA) as it now goes to 0. This compares similar with surgical outcomes, Choi says.
 

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