Dr. Hershman on the Equivalency of Biosimilars and Biologics

Dawn L. Hershman, MD, MS
Published: Friday, Sep 06, 2019



Dawn L. Hershman, MD, MS, professor of Medicine and Epidemiology, leader of the breast cancer program at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center, discusses the equivalency of biosimilars and biologics.

The data that have been published or presented suggest the similarity between biosimilar and biologic agents, says Hershman. Although biosimilars could establish a substantial cost differential, and lower the overall cost of cancer care, there is still a lot of hesitance regarding their use in oncology.

The development of biologic agents is not sustainable. The field needs to figure out ways to save money so that patients can afford these life-saving medications, says Hershman. Biosimilars are an effective means of ensuring patients can complete their therapy. For example, if a patient with breast cancer requires a multiregimen treatment course, using a trastuzumab (Herceptin) biosimilar could lower the total cost of care. Ultimately, the field needs to be more accepting of the potential gains biosimilars have to offer following a demonstration of clinical equivalence, concludes Hershman.
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Dawn L. Hershman, MD, MS, professor of Medicine and Epidemiology, leader of the breast cancer program at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center, discusses the equivalency of biosimilars and biologics.

The data that have been published or presented suggest the similarity between biosimilar and biologic agents, says Hershman. Although biosimilars could establish a substantial cost differential, and lower the overall cost of cancer care, there is still a lot of hesitance regarding their use in oncology.

The development of biologic agents is not sustainable. The field needs to figure out ways to save money so that patients can afford these life-saving medications, says Hershman. Biosimilars are an effective means of ensuring patients can complete their therapy. For example, if a patient with breast cancer requires a multiregimen treatment course, using a trastuzumab (Herceptin) biosimilar could lower the total cost of care. Ultimately, the field needs to be more accepting of the potential gains biosimilars have to offer following a demonstration of clinical equivalence, concludes Hershman.

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Medical Crossfire®: Addressing Uncertainties in Oncology BiosimilarsApr 30, 20201.5
Community Practice Connections™: Show Me the Data™: Leveraging the Evidence to Optimize Applications of Biosimilars in CancerAug 30, 20201.5
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