Dr. Kujtan on Patient Preferences in the Treatment of NSCLC

Lara Kujtan, MD
Published: Tuesday, Jan 22, 2019



Lara Kujtan, MD, assistant professor at the University of Missouri–Kansas City School of Medicine, discusses the importance of patient preferences in the treatment of oncogene-driven non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Although there are many targeted therapies for EGFR-mutated NSCLC that show survival benefit, it is important to remember the toxicities associated with these agents. Patients might prefer a regimen that is more tolerable than a regimen with severe associated adverse events, explains Kujtan.

In a trial presented at the 2018 World Lung Conference, investigators examined patient preferences regarding treatment for EGFR-positive NSCLC. For the trial, participants were asked to fill out a survey which involved a hypothetical scenario in which they had to choose between drug “A” and drug “B.” Drug “A” was associated with a better progression-free survival (PFS) but severe adverse events, whereas drug “B” provided less of a PFS benefit, but greater tolerability. Results revealed that half of patients opted for drug “A,” while the other half opted for drug “B.”

While some patients value longevity, others value less adverse events, states Kujtan; this underscores the importance of having conversations with patients regarding treatment plans in order to ensure that their preferences are factored into the decision-making process.
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Lara Kujtan, MD, assistant professor at the University of Missouri–Kansas City School of Medicine, discusses the importance of patient preferences in the treatment of oncogene-driven non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Although there are many targeted therapies for EGFR-mutated NSCLC that show survival benefit, it is important to remember the toxicities associated with these agents. Patients might prefer a regimen that is more tolerable than a regimen with severe associated adverse events, explains Kujtan.

In a trial presented at the 2018 World Lung Conference, investigators examined patient preferences regarding treatment for EGFR-positive NSCLC. For the trial, participants were asked to fill out a survey which involved a hypothetical scenario in which they had to choose between drug “A” and drug “B.” Drug “A” was associated with a better progression-free survival (PFS) but severe adverse events, whereas drug “B” provided less of a PFS benefit, but greater tolerability. Results revealed that half of patients opted for drug “A,” while the other half opted for drug “B.”

While some patients value longevity, others value less adverse events, states Kujtan; this underscores the importance of having conversations with patients regarding treatment plans in order to ensure that their preferences are factored into the decision-making process.

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Online Medical Crossfire®: 5th Annual Miami Lung Cancer ConferenceMay 30, 20196.5
Community Practice Connections™: Working Group for Changing Standards in EGFR-Mutated Lung Cancers: Real-World Applications of the Evidence for NursesJun 29, 20191.5
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