Dr. Long on the Results of the Pooled Analysis of the COMBI-i Trial in Melanoma

Georgina V. Long, BSc, PhD, MBBS, FRACP
Published: Tuesday, Aug 27, 2019



Georgina V. Long, BSc, PhD, MBBS, FRACP, co-medical director of Melanoma Institute Australia (MIA), chair of Melanoma Medical Oncology and Translational Research at MIA and Royal North Shore Hospital, University of Sydney, discusses the results of the pooled analysis of parts 1 and 2 of the phase III COMBI-i study.

The COMBI-i trial is exploring the combination of targeted therapy and immunotherapy—specifically, dabrafenib (Tafinlar) and trametinib (Mekinist) plus an anti–PD-1 drug called spartalizumab. In parts 1 and 2, researchers evaluated 36 patients who were given a full dose of all 3 drugs together. The triplet therapy induced a response rate of 78%. Only one patient progressed on the treatment, says Long. Notably, the median progression-free survival was above 20 months with the triplet, which compares favorably to what has been observed with either a PD-1 inhibitor alone or the combination of dabrafenib and trametinib.

In terms of adverse events, pyrexia was more extensive with the triplet therapy than with the combination of dabrafenib and trametinib alone; however, this is being explored further in part 3 of the trial, says Long. In part 3, patients will be randomized to receive either the triplet therapy or dabrafenib and trametinib alone. To date, the toxicity appears to be very manageable with proper patient and physician education, concludes Long.
SELECTED
LANGUAGE


Georgina V. Long, BSc, PhD, MBBS, FRACP, co-medical director of Melanoma Institute Australia (MIA), chair of Melanoma Medical Oncology and Translational Research at MIA and Royal North Shore Hospital, University of Sydney, discusses the results of the pooled analysis of parts 1 and 2 of the phase III COMBI-i study.

The COMBI-i trial is exploring the combination of targeted therapy and immunotherapy—specifically, dabrafenib (Tafinlar) and trametinib (Mekinist) plus an anti–PD-1 drug called spartalizumab. In parts 1 and 2, researchers evaluated 36 patients who were given a full dose of all 3 drugs together. The triplet therapy induced a response rate of 78%. Only one patient progressed on the treatment, says Long. Notably, the median progression-free survival was above 20 months with the triplet, which compares favorably to what has been observed with either a PD-1 inhibitor alone or the combination of dabrafenib and trametinib.

In terms of adverse events, pyrexia was more extensive with the triplet therapy than with the combination of dabrafenib and trametinib alone; however, this is being explored further in part 3 of the trial, says Long. In part 3, patients will be randomized to receive either the triplet therapy or dabrafenib and trametinib alone. To date, the toxicity appears to be very manageable with proper patient and physician education, concludes Long.

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Advances in™ Melanoma: Exploring BRAF/MEK in Adjuvant and Neoadjuvant SettingsSep 28, 20191.5
Medical Crossfire®: What Does Data Tell Us About How to Optimize Checkpoint Inhibitor Strategies Across Lines of Care for Patients with Melanoma?Nov 30, 20191.5
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x