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Cristi Radford on Utilizing Gene Panels in Ovarian Cancer

Cristi Radford, MS, CGC, from the Sarasota Memorial Hospital, discusses examining cancer gene panels using next generation sequencing for patients with ovarian cancer.

Cristi Radford, MS, CGC, Certified Genetic Counselor, Genetic Education Program, Sarasota Memorial Hospital, discusses examining cancer gene panels using next generation sequencing for patients with ovarian cancer.

Previously, specialists thought that roughly 10% of each new diagnosis of ovarian cancer was related to genes and family history. According to Radford, approximately 1 in 4 cases of ovarian cancer can now be linked to genetics. This calls for the utilization of next generation sequencing that examines a panel of genes.

In addition to being cheaper, in the long run, it also helps detect hereditary cancer in patients who did not have established or recorded family history. In addition to BRCA, panels would examine several other genes, which could help guide treatment decisions.

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