Dr. Abida on the Clinical Significance of the TRITON2 Study in mCRPC

Partner | Cancer Centers | <b>Perlmutter Cancer Center at NYU Langone</b>

Wassim Abida, MD, PhD, discusses the clinical significance of the results from the phase 2 TRITON2 trial in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

Wassim Abida, MD, PhD, medical oncologist, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, discusses the clinical significance of the results from the phase 2 TRITON2 trial (NCT02952534) in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).

The TRITON2 trial enrolled men with mCRPC who progressed after 1 or 2 prior lines of next-generation androgen receptor (AR)–directed therapy and 1 taxane-based chemotherapy, Abida says. Patients harbored a deleterious BRCA1/2 mutation, Abida adds. 

The primary end point of the trial was overall response rate (ORR) with key secondary end points including duration of response for radiographic response, rate of confirmed locally assessed prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response, time to PSA progression, radiographic progression-free survival, overall survival, and safety, Abida explains.

Findings from the trial demonstrated that treatment with the PARP inhibitor rucaparib (Rubraca) led to an ORR of 43.5% per independent radiology review and 50.8% per investigator assessment, Abida says.

Notably, these findings led the FDA to grant an accelerated approval to rucaparib on May 15, 2020, as the first PARP inhibitor available for use in men with mCRPC who harbor a deleterious, germline or somatic BRCA mutation after treatment with AR-directed therapy and a taxane-based chemotherapy, Abida concludes.