Video

Dr. Branagan on the Role of Transplant in High-Risk Multiple Myeloma

Andrew Branagan, MD, discusses the role of autologous stem cell transplantation in patients with high-risk multiple myeloma.

Andrew Branagan, MD, a medical oncologist in the Center for Multiple Myeloma at Mass General Cancer Center in Massachusetts General Hospital, discusses the role of autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in patients with high-risk multiple myeloma.

The role of transplant has been a mainstay in multiple myeloma as it can lead to improved progression-free survival and overall survival for patients with high-risk disease, says Branagan.

As such, up-front transplant is recommended for transplant-eligible patients, says Branagan.

Age is a factor in determining transplant eligibility, explains Branagan. Historically, patients had to be under the age of 65 to be eligible for transplant. However, in the United States, patients are able to be transplanted into their early 70s.

Additionally, patients who are eligible for ASCT should not have major comorbidities and should not be frail, concludes Branagan.

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