Video

Dr. Chapman on Targeted Treatments for Non-Traditional Mutations in Melanoma

Paul B. Chapman, MD, medical oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, professor of medicine at the Weill Cornell Medical College, discusses targeted treatments for non-traditional mutations in melanoma.

Paul B. Chapman, MD, medical oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, professor of medicine at the Weill Cornell Medical College, discusses targeted treatments for non-traditional mutations in melanoma.

Chapman explains that non-BRAF V600 mutations are known as class II and class III mutations in melanoma. Class II mutations are similar to the BRAF V600 mutations except that they require dimerization of mutant BRAF. Ongoing clinical trials are looking at breaking apart these dimers. Class III mutations are more complicated in that they require upstream activation by RAS. Presently, MEK inhibitors are seen as the best way to target class III mutations.

However, investigators question what the best way to administer a MEK inhibitor to these patients is. Debate exists as to whether or not these inhibitors should be administered daily or periodically at high doses.

Clinicians referring a patient to MSK can do so by visiting msk.org/refer, emailing referapatient@mskcc.org, or by calling 833-315-2722.
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