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Dr. Ellis on the Entrance of Biosimilars Into the Field of Oncology

Matthew J. Ellis, MD, PhD, professor and director, Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center, associate director of precision medicine, Dan L. Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, discusses the entrance of biosimilars into the field of oncology.

Matthew J. Ellis, MD, PhD, professor and director, Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center, associate director of precision medicine, Dan L. Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, discusses the entrance of biosimilars into the field of oncology.

If biosimilars are of a high quality, there should not be a problem with their adoption into the field of oncology, explains Ellis. Biosimilars have to meet certain performance criteria, as mandated by the FDA. Once a biosimilar is approved, it can lessen the financial burden of other therapies. If every drug cost $100,000, physicians would not be able to practice oncology, says Ellis.

As the patent system enables drugs to be delivered at lower costs and as drugs come off label, a new space is created for more drugs to move into, explains Ellis. That is where biosimilars can enter the market. As long as biosimilars are carefully monitored, Ellis explains that he sees no problem with their use in oncology.

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