Video

Dr. Eng Discusses the BEACON CRC Study in BRAF-Mutated CRC

Author(s):

Cathy Eng, MD, professor of gastrointestinal and medical oncology, Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses the BEACON CRC study in patients with BRAF-mutated colorectal cancer.

Cathy Eng, MD, professor of gastrointestinal medical oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses the BEACON CRC study in patients with BRAF V600E-mutant metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC).

BRAF mutations in CRC have historically been a poor prognostic indicator. Patients should always be tested for these alterations, especially if they are microsatellite instability—high from hypermethylation. Additionally, older patients who may not necessarily have Lynch syndrome, says Eng. BEACON CRC is a 3-arm trial; however not all the data have been reported yet. Eng says the most impressive investigational arm involves 3 drugs: encorafenib (Braftovi), binimetinib (Mektovi), and cetuximab (Erbitux)—a triplet regimen comprised of a BRAF inhibitor, a MEK inhibitor, and an EGFR inhibitor, respectively.

In the first 30 patients enrolled in the study, investigators did a run-in analysis that showed an overall response rate (ORR) of 48% in all patients. In patients who received 1 prior line of therapy, the ORR was 59%. The estimated median progression-free survival was 8 months and the overall survival was 15.3 months, Eng adds. These data suggest that directed therapy in an earlier setting may be more beneficial for patients with BRAF V600E-mutant mCRC.

Related Videos
Sujith Samarasinghe, MD
Suzanne Trudel, MSc, MD
Consuelo Bertossi, MD
Michael R. Grunwald, MD, FACP
Sundar Jagannath, MBBS
Kevin Kalinsky, MD, MS,
Aaron Gerds, MD
Paolo Tarantino, MD
Chinmay Jani, MD, clinical fellow, Hematology & Oncology, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital
Shella Saint Fleur-Lominy, MD, PhD