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Dr. Gordon Discusses Use of Checkpoint Inhibitors in Hodgkin Lymphoma

Leo I. Gordon, MD, Abby and John Friend Professor of Oncology Research, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, discusses the use of checkpoint inhibitors in the treatment of patients with Hodgkin lymphoma.

Leo I. Gordon, MD, Abby and John Friend Professor of Oncology Research, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, discusses the promise of checkpoint inhibitors in the treatment of patients with Hodgkin lymphoma.

Checkpoint inhibitors seem to be effective in Hodgkin lymphoma, and researchers over the years have tried to define the best place for this class of drugs in the treatment paradigm, Gordon says. For example, there is an ongoing study looking at single-agent pembrolizumab (Keytruda) followed by the standard regimen of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine in the frontline setting for patients with advanced disease. Early data have been impressive, Gordon says, showing clear decreases in tumor volume even in patients with bulky disease.

The phase II portion of this study, involving approximately 30 patients, has almost reached completion, and researchers are planning a larger phase III study which will focus on patients with large-volume disease. Barring any unforeseen toxicity, Gordan adds, checkpoint inhibition should be here to stay in Hodgkin lymphoma.

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