Video

Dr. Holcombe on Regorafenib for Colorectal Cancer

Randall F. Holcombe, MD, from the Tisch Cancer Institute at Mount Sinai Medical Center, discusses the oral multikinase inhibitor regorafenib for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

Randall F. Holcombe, MD, Associate Director for Clinical Affairs and Director of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology for the Division of Hematology/Oncology at the Tisch Cancer Institute at Mount Sinai Medical Center, discusses the oral multikinase inhibitor regorafenib (Stivarga) for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC).

Holcombe notes that the FDA recently approved regorafenib for patients with treatment refractory mCRC. In general, these patients have exhausted all available treatment options, including chemotherapy and biologic agents, such as bevacizumab and EGFR-targeted therapies for patients with KRAS wild type mutations.

Regorafenib was approved based on results from the randomized, placebo-controlled, phase III CORRECT trial. In the trial, median overall survival with regorafenib was 6.4 months and progression-free survival was 1.9 months, when compared to placebo.

Holcombe believes this agent will be very useful for patients with good performance status, since progression on all other therapies is common.

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