Video

Dr. Jotte on the Low Rate of Screening in Lung Cancer

Robert M. Jotte, MD, PhD, medical director and co-chair of the USON Thoracic Committee at Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, discusses the low rate of screening for lung cancer.

Robert M. Jotte, MD, PhD, medical director and co-chair of the USON Thoracic Committee at Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, discusses the low rate of screening for lung cancer.

There are many reasons why there is such a low rate of lung cancer screening, explains Jotte. The primary reason is that the topic is not being brought up. Primary care providers are expected to address a variety of problems in a relatively short office visit, and so lung cancer screening is often overlooked. Physicians must decipher what the immediate risk to the patient is, and proceed accordingly.

In a 15-minute appointment, a patient is expected to disclose all their problems, have the physician address those problems, and take a couple minutes to discuss a risk that may never materialize. However, for the patients in whom it does materialize, it can be lifesaving, says Jotte.

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