Dr. Nangia on the SCALP Trial for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

Video

Julie R. Nangia, MD, assistant professor, Breast Center-Clinic, faculty senator, Baylor College of Medicine, discusses the results of the Scalp Cooling Alopecia Prevention trial (SCALP) for patients with early-stage breast cancer.

Julie R. Nangia, MD, assistant professor, Breast Center-Clinic, faculty senator, Baylor College of Medicine, discusses the results of the Scalp Cooling Alopecia Prevention trial (SCALP) for patients with early-stage breast cancer.

Researchers planned to evaluate 235 participants on the trial, randomized in a 2:1 ratio of scalp cooling with the Orbis Paxman Hair Loss Prevention System to control, Nangia explains. After 142 women were evaluable for the primary endpoint—which was hair retention after 4 cycles of chemotherapy—the study ended early due to the strong efficacy shown with the device.

Results of a pre-planned interim analysis, which occurred after 95 patients received the device and 47 women were on the control arm, showed that 50% of those who received scalp cooling retained their hair, and 0% of patients on the control arm retained their hair.

The overall message is that scalp cooling devices are safe and effective, she adds. Nangia hopes these devices will soon become available for patients worldwide.

Related Videos
Petros Grivas, MD, PhD, professor, Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center; professor, Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of Washington (UW) School of Medicine; clinical director, Genitourinary Cancers Program, UW Medicine
Somedeb Ball, MBBS, assistant professor, medicine, Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Phillip J. Koo, MD
Gabriella Smith, MD
Mikkael A. Sekeres, MD, MS
Francesco Di Meo, PhD
Ko Un “Clara” Park, MD
Naseema Gangat, MBBS
Erin Frances Cobain, MD
Pashtoon Murtaza Kasi, MD, MS