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Prostate Cancer Screening and Early Detection, Part III

Continuing the previous discussion on prostate cancer screening, Neal D. Shore, MD, describes how the recent United States Preventive Service Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on PSA testing has affected his practice. (View other discussions.)

Shore believes the recommendation was made without any forethought to how it would be received and interpreted by the public. As a result, he feels many patients have completely discredited PSA testing, which he does not feel was the goal of the USPSTF decision.

Ultimately, an increase in patients with high-risk factors who do not receive appropriate diagnosis and screening could increase the number of patients presenting with advanced prostate cancer. Shore does not believe a one-size-fits-all recommendation is the best approach and guidance is needed to better determine who should be screened, diagnosed, and biopsied.

In general, panelist Paul R. Sieber, MD, concurs with Shore, adding that the USPSTF recommendation has added an extra burden to his daily practice.

View >>> PSA Screening, Part IView >>> PSA Screening, Part II

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