Dr. Sweeney on the Phase III ENZAMET Trial in Metastatic Hormone-Sensitive Prostate Cancer

Christopher Sweeney, MBBS
Published: Monday, Jun 03, 2019



Christopher Sweeney, MBBS, medical oncologist at the Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, discusses results of the phase III ENZAMET trial, which looked at standard therapy with or without enzalutamide (Xtandi) as a treatment for patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.

It is known that in this hormone-sensitive setting that patients also benefit from receiving docetaxel, which was discovered in the CHAARTED trial, Sweeney explains. Therefore, ENZAMET was then amended to include a group of patients who could also receive prior docetaxel, which was approximately 50% of enrolled patients and included mostly those with a high volume of disease. Results showed that enzalutamide prolonged overall survival (OS) in patients with high- and low-volume disease, and a longer time to disease progression. 

Additionally, although early enzalutamide prolonged time to progression in patients who received docetaxel, there was not a significant treatment effect. Those who did not have docetaxel had a clear improvement in time to progression and also in OS, Sweeney concludes.

<<< 2019 ASCO Annual Meeting


Christopher Sweeney, MBBS, medical oncologist at the Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, discusses results of the phase III ENZAMET trial, which looked at standard therapy with or without enzalutamide (Xtandi) as a treatment for patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.

It is known that in this hormone-sensitive setting that patients also benefit from receiving docetaxel, which was discovered in the CHAARTED trial, Sweeney explains. Therefore, ENZAMET was then amended to include a group of patients who could also receive prior docetaxel, which was approximately 50% of enrolled patients and included mostly those with a high volume of disease. Results showed that enzalutamide prolonged overall survival (OS) in patients with high- and low-volume disease, and a longer time to disease progression. 

Additionally, although early enzalutamide prolonged time to progression in patients who received docetaxel, there was not a significant treatment effect. Those who did not have docetaxel had a clear improvement in time to progression and also in OS, Sweeney concludes.

<<< 2019 ASCO Annual Meeting

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