Dr. Garon Discusses the CheckMate-384 Study in NSCLC

Edward B. Garon, MD
Published: Thursday, Apr 12, 2018



Edward B. Garon, MD, director of Thoracic Oncology at the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at University of California, Los Angeles, discusses the CheckMate-384 study in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during the 2018 European Lung Cancer Congress, which is a joint collaboration between ESMO and the IASLC.

CheckMate-384 is a phase IIIb/IV dose-frequency optimization trial in progress of nivolumab (Opdivo) in advanced or metastatic NSCLC. The currently approved dosing of nivolumab in this population is 240 mg every 2 weeks until progression or discontinuation due to toxicity. This study is investigating this regimen randomized against 480 mg every 4 weeks.

Garon says that in an ideal world, patients would not have to come into the clinic every 2 weeks for treatment. This trial is aiming to see if this higher, less frequent dosing schedule will be as effective as what is currently done in practice. Additionally, reducing dose frequency could optimize convenience during long-term nivolumab therapy, which could improve quality of life for patients.


Edward B. Garon, MD, director of Thoracic Oncology at the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at University of California, Los Angeles, discusses the CheckMate-384 study in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during the 2018 European Lung Cancer Congress, which is a joint collaboration between ESMO and the IASLC.

CheckMate-384 is a phase IIIb/IV dose-frequency optimization trial in progress of nivolumab (Opdivo) in advanced or metastatic NSCLC. The currently approved dosing of nivolumab in this population is 240 mg every 2 weeks until progression or discontinuation due to toxicity. This study is investigating this regimen randomized against 480 mg every 4 weeks.

Garon says that in an ideal world, patients would not have to come into the clinic every 2 weeks for treatment. This trial is aiming to see if this higher, less frequent dosing schedule will be as effective as what is currently done in practice. Additionally, reducing dose frequency could optimize convenience during long-term nivolumab therapy, which could improve quality of life for patients.

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Community Practice Connections™: Oncology Best Practice™: Choosing Therapies for Patients with EGFR-mutant Lung Cancers: More Options... More Decisions... Better OutcomesApr 27, 20182.0
Community Practice Connections™: Translating Research to Inform Changing Paradigms: Assessment of Emerging Immuno-Oncology Strategies and Combinations Across Lung, Head and Neck, and Bladder CancersApr 28, 20182.0
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